Other Stories
  • Jonas Paint-ner flat shares with Lina Wagner, Gotti Stoeckl and Palestinian refugee Yassin Hawwa, in Vienna, Austria. Jonas and Yassin have quickly become thick friends. Yassin, 26, who studied filmmaking was forced to flee south Lebanon and head to Europe in July 2015 after filming a documentary about Islamic extremism. He and his friends were beaten, threatened and harassed by followers of a powerful sheikh they had interviewed. In Vienna, he met Jonas who is studying Communication Science and was invited to share their flat with Lina and Gotti. "We get along great, Jonas is one of my best friends now. We spend a lot of time together and are making a short movie together," said Yassin. "He is definitely a friend” says Jonas. “We cook and eat together and help each other out with projects, ideas, especially media projects together. We also party together."
  • Uta (44) hosts Hamid, a refugee from Afghanistan, in a small studio apartment in Berlin Marzahn, a sprawling estate of high-rise blocks in east Berlin. Built in the late seventies and early eighties to provide modern housing to residents of the city's older and (at the time) neglected central boroughs, the estate became characterised in the nineties by strong anti-migrant sentiment and support for far-right groups.

Uta has two children of her own. A son (17) who lives with her ex-husband and a daughter (22), who is studying in Hamburg.

After being off work with ill-health for two years Uta returned to Berlin in the summer of 2015, to attend a physical rehab centre in Potsdam and live near her mother. She also started a new job at a home for young refugees run by the German Red Cross, where she met Hamid.

They talked about music. He plays the flute and the piano and wants to learn more instruments. Uta plays the piano and the guitar. They had found a shared passion.

Uta now teaches Hamid the keyboard and encourages him to play her guitar. Hamid wants to study classical guitar and become a professional musician one day, but he feels short on confidence. He also likes rap and pop music "because you can talk about social problems."

“My neighbours have not been the most welcoming,” Uta tells us. Whenever Uta added Hamid's name to the letterbox it was quickly removed. Instead of numbers, letterboxes throughout Germany carry the name of the legally registered tenant on them, which means that it's hard to receive post if a name is missing. One of her neighbours told Uta “we don't want foreigners here” but Uta says she fights this kind of behaviour. “He's my son,” she replied, “you just have to get used to it.”

For Uta it was a real challenge. "I had to end friendships with people who didn't accept what I was doing. It was a shock to see how mean and small minded towards others people can be. It's exhausting. You really hit the edges of your energy and
  • Austria. Martina Schamberger, with husband Engelbert, son Laurenz, and Lea, host Syrian refugee, and former national basketball player, Nawras Ahmadook in Bad Schallerbach.
  • Originally from Damascus, Mouhanad fled his war-torn country in 2012. He initially went to Libya, and eventually embarked on the perilous journey to Europe in September 2015. After six rough days on the road, he stopped to shower and rest in Vienna. And, in those 48 hours, Mourad says he fell in love with Vienna and decided to stay. As soon as he got to a refugee reception centre, Mouhanad started helping in the kitchen, learned the language and made friends. He got his asylum papers in six months and soon after, moved in with his new flatmates. Valerie said the roommates were initially concerned Mouhanad might require a lot of assistance, and guidance. They were pleasantly surprised. "Mouhanad knows more people than we do. His list of contacts is incredible and we didn't have to step in – he doesn't need us at all," Valerie said. "He is standing on his own feet very well," said Roman. "We thought we might have to look after him like a younger brother but we didn't have to do anything. He's also very orderly, very organized, a very German Syrian." Nora describes Mouhanad as very caring, always smiling and giving back to others. "He found his place in Austria very quickly," she said. Mouhanad co-founded a group called Refugees for Refugees and wants to get his Master's degree.
  • Germany. Edgar and Amelie Rai with their two children, Nelly (9) and Moritz (12), host Syrian refugees and brothers, Bilal (26 - seated) and Amr (17) Aljaber, in Berlin.
  • Austria. Sabine David, husband Dominique and daughter Nora, 1, host Afghan refugee Nooria Youldash and her 2-year-old daughter, Aysu, in Lavanttal.
  • Austria. Margarethe Kramer (59) hosts Iraqi refugee Souad Awad (49) in Lavanttal.
  • Sabine Waldner with her daughters, Charlotte and Miriam, host two Syrian refugees, Juan (16) and Mohammed (16), classmates from Damascus, at their home in Falkensee, Germany. This portrait is part of the No Stranger Place series, which portrays locals and
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